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The ADI Instructional Model

The 8 stages of ADI are the same for each investigation so students have an opportunity to use the same science and engineering practices, but different disciplinary core ideas and crosscutting concepts to figure out how things work or why things happen.

The 8 Stages of ADI

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Stage 1

Identify the Task and the Guiding Question

The teacher begins an ADI lab investigation by identifying a phenomenon to investigate and a guiding question for the students to answer. The goal of the teacher at this stage of the model is to capture the students’ interest and provide them with a reason to design and carry out an investigation. This stage provides students with an opportunity to use disciplinary core ideas and crosscutting concepts to figure out how things work or why things happen.

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Stage 2

Design a Method and Collect Data

The teacher groups the students into small research teams. The teams are then directed to design a method that they can use to collect the data they will need to answer the guiding question. The teams then use their method to collect data after the teacher approves it. This stage gives students an opportunity to learn how to design and carry out an investigation in science.

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Stage 3

Develop an Initial Argument

Students analyze the data they collected and then develop an initial argument. The argument consists of a claim, evidence in support of the claim, and a justification of the evidence. This stage helps students learn how to analyze and interpret data, develop and use models, use mathematics or computational thinking, construct explanations, and argue from evidence in science.

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Stage 4

Argumentation Session

The students share their initial arguments and critique the arguments of their classmates. At the end of the argumentation session, each team has an opportunity to revise their arguments in order to make them better. This stage helps students learn how to argue from evidence, ask questions, and obtain, evaluate, and communicate information in science. It also helps students develop their communication and presentation skills.

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Stage 5

Explicit and Reflective Discussion

The teacher should encourage the students to share what they know about the disciplinary core ideas they used during the investigation and their ideas plans for designing better investigations in the future. The teacher should also encourage students to think about how they used one or more crosscutting concepts of science during the investigation or concepts related to the nature of scientific knowledge or the development of scientific knowledge.

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Stage 6

Write an Investigation Report

Each student writes an investigation report to share the goal of the investigation, the method used during the investigation, and his or her final argument. This stage helps students learn how to analyze and interpret data, develop and use models, use mathematics or computational thinking, construct explanations, argue from evidence in science, and communicate information in science. It also helps students develop their ability to write in science.

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Stage 7

Double-Blind Group Peer Review

Each research team reviews several investigation reports in order to ensure quality and to provide their classmates with the feedback they need in order to improve. This stage helps students learn how to evaluate information in science. It also helps students develop their ability to read and critique an argumentative text.

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Stage 8

Revise and Submit the Report

Students use the feedback from the peer review to revise their report. The reports are then submitted to the teacher for a final evaluation. This stage of Argument-Driven Inquiry helps students learn how to communicate information in science and how to improve their writing based on feedback they receive from others.